Things organized neatly is a magnet for children, more so than candy. They can’t help but be drawn to order and think “How can mess with it?” This theory proven today as I get ready to fiercely put together another ikea cabinet while the children huddle around my tool desk.

Things organized neatly is a magnet for children, more so than candy. They can’t help but be drawn to order and think “How can mess with it?” This theory proven today as I get ready to fiercely put together another ikea cabinet while the children huddle around my tool desk.

Just the ladies in the car for Denver! Off to visit my mom for a good long while. :)

Just the ladies in the car for Denver! Off to visit my mom for a good long while. :)

As I was sitting on the plane, looking over the wing, I thought this is how people feel the force of God in nature. Others feel it in the words of their prophet, the rituals of their ancestors, the ancient songs of their people, and in the faces of the whole human family. I affirm every incarnation of divinity we find.

Justine Magara Unitarian Universalist Minister from Kenya

Landing in Detroit for a connecting flight. Look at this big body of water! Like a great…lake or something.

Landing in Detroit for a connecting flight. Look at this big body of water! Like a great…lake or something.

youarelovedforyou:

We are a group of Unitarian Universalists, committed to spreading the truth that you are already loved for who you are.  And we’re launching Sunday, June 15th. What to do until then? Give us a follow, spread the news, and get ready. Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/lovedforwhoyouare Twitter: http://twitter.com/lovedbyus Tumblr: http://youarelovedforyou.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/lovedforwhoyouare Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/LovedForYou/

youarelovedforyou:

We are a group of Unitarian Universalists, committed to spreading the truth that you are already loved for who you are.

And we’re launching Sunday, June 15th. What to do until then? Give us a follow, spread the news, and get ready.

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/lovedforwhoyouare
Twitter: http://twitter.com/lovedbyus
Tumblr: http://youarelovedforyou.tumblr.com/
Instagram: http://instagram.com/lovedforwhoyouare
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/LovedForYou/

(via uuworld)

 

[93 years ago on this day May 31, 1921, the Tulsa Race Riot began. It is marked as the deadliest race riot in the history of the U.S. & destroyed what was known as, Black Wall Street.


Black Wall Street was the wealthiest black community in the United States, full of black owned businesses consisting of: 

movie theaters 
dental offices
independent newspapers
restaurants
grocery stores
a bank
post offices
a bus system
schools
airplanes
law offices 
its own hospital.

Racial tension boiled over on May 30, 1921 when a white woman accused a black boy of sexual assault. Late that night, a mob of nearly 10,000 white men launched an all out assault on Black Wall Street systematically burning down every home & business. 

Attacks came from both the ground and the sky as the mobs used planes from World War I to drop firebombs and shoot at residents. African Americans that were captured were held in internment camps around the city by local police & National Guard units.

Blacks who were injured during the 16 hour attack couldn’t seek medical care because the mobs torched the only black hospital in the city.

The attack left about 10,000 African Americans homeless and 35 city blocks burned to the ground. In total, 1,256 houses & 191 businesses (including churches, a middle school & a hospital) were burned. 

In the aftermath, it was estimated that 300 African Americans were killed and many of their bodies were buried in unmarked graves.

The Tulsa Race Riot was taught for the 1st time in Tulsa public schools in 2012. #NeverForget #BlackWallStreet #BlackHistory

Via: soulrevision:

[For more on social justice, follow me on Instagram: soulrevision , Tumblr: soulrevision , Facebook: soulrevision , Twitter: soulrevision]

(via coyotesqrl)

Of what use is prayer

He said nothing. All he did was pray. What could that do? How does praying to an invisible force persuade it to do anything? 

When Pope Francis put his head against the illegal wall that Isreal constructed into occupied territories of Palestine, he said nothing. All he did was pray.

There was no reasoning involved in this gesture. There was nothing to say about a wall built that oppresses and protects. Each side, to me, is hopelessly entrenched in the anger and blood of their people. That’s what you can do when there is nothing to say, when all hope is lost.

You can pray. 

Granted, the Pope wields a lot of influence and power. But the Pope didn’t use that power to reason; to lay out facts, cajole, chastise, or command resolution. He, as a symbolic person, prayed in a symbolic spot.

The power of prayer is in the meaning brought from it. I respect that for many people the meaning of prayer is a harmful meaning. I have been on the snide end of the “I’ll pray for you” more than once myself, though I have not been forced to receive prayer or bow my head. But if it were a powerless gesture, then the reaction to it would be indifference. For most people, it is not. It still has meaning.

The use of prayer, as this example of the Pope praying at the wall here, is to convey meaning, to do something when nothing else can be done, to try something when there is nothing left to try. Alone, out of sight, prayer is meditation. In full public view, prayer is a symbol of hope.

Reading List of Junot Díaz

I love fantasy, and have a book in mind, so this is awesome. Its from his course:

“This class concerns the design and analysis of imaginary (or constructed) worlds for narrative media such as roleplaying games, films, comics, videogames and literary texts. … The class’ primary goal is to help participants create better imaginary worlds - ultimately all our efforts should serve that higher purpose.”

Reading List:

“A Princess of Mars” by ER Burroughs
“Dracula” by Bram Stoker
“Batman: The Dark Knight Returns” by Frank Miller
“Sunshine” by Robin McKinley
“V for Vendetta” by Alan Moore
“The Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins
“The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms” by NK Jemisin
“Lilith’s Brood” by Octavia Butler
“Perdido Street Station” by China Miéville
“Snow Crash” by Neal Stephenson (Recommended)

From: Here’s a list of what Junot Diaz wants you to read